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JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> Seems like there should be some 'unionised' legal representation for founders

Just pick a lawyer who works for founders. (Any competent firm will also find this in conflicts.)

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> it was washington post and new york times were also one of the outlets to downplay Trump's assassination attempt you can find it on X

You’ve been asked for sources and seemingly have none. If you made it up why keep commenting?

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
tptacek ranked #1 [karma: 390032]

This particular story doesn't seem like a negotiation failure so much as a grave failure of this person's legal counsel in drafting the final agreement.

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

“Unconfirmed open-source reports claim that Ukraine had lost 58 pieces of equipment in the mission compared to Russia’s 271.”

stavros ranked #50 [karma: 64789]

Well, if you're so unimaginative as to call your cloud platform "<companyname> cloud platform", it's not the fault of the second company whose name also starts with a G.

stavros ranked #50 [karma: 64789]

And it only took thirty-five years!

tptacek ranked #1 [karma: 390032]

XML-DSIG is probably one of the 3 worst cryptosystems ever designed (don't ask me what the other two are, I'm just sure XML-DSIG is one of them) and the system is so complicated that a huge percentage of the deployed base of SAML systems, regardless of their language and library choices, backend onto the same ancient libxmlsec codebase.

If I could avoid doing SAML (we have so far!), I would avoid doing so as long as I could.

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

“Ronaile Burton, who allegedly slashed the tires of at least 19 Waymo vehicles. San Francisco prosecutors have filed criminal charges against her to which she has pleaded not guilty. A hearing is scheduled for Tuesday.

Burton’s public defender, Adam Birka-White, says in a statement that Burton ‘is someone in need of help and not jail’…”

It sounds like they need both [1].

[1] https://www.thesfnews.com/ronaile-burton-arrested-in-serial-...

Animats ranked #10 [karma: 140516]

Also see Ramsey Pricing.[1] "Ramsey pricing (for a monopolist) says to mark up most the goods with the least elastic (that is, least price-sensitive) demand or supply." That's kind of obvious.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramsey_problem

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> it's a subjective quantity -- a property of the observer, not the observed

Shannon's entropy is a property of the source-channel-receiver system.

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> More expensive than what?

“The average wage in Nigeria is about $25 per day.” Wages in Southern Wyoming are more expensive than that. Gig or minimum is irrelevant.

> how does that relate to minimum wages

Wyoming is subject to the federal minimum wage.

> how does that relate to minimum wages with respect to gig work?

We’re comparing two numbers and observing one of them is bigger.

TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

That's how you breed shadow employment. People on welfare who can work often will find jobs that pay some, or all of the salary, under the table. The attitude this instills in children is that of having to work hard, while scheming against the taxman, to improve your life. Some people then do that way past the point they need to, and end up at risk of being caught for tax evasion.

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

Something that seems strange to me is the deal they made with MLS which I don’t think was great for MLS.

Today MLS has the problem that people think “American soccer sucks” and won’t give it a chance. I caught a game in person because I was interested in the state of American soccer and between the game and the fan experience I had a great time.

A sport that has room to grow has to be easy for people to catch a game who aren’t committed to subscribing to it. They can win people over if they can catch an occasional game for free but if it is behind a paywall 100% of the time it’s going to stay obscure. NBC runs a free Premier League game every Saturday and if you want more you can get it as part of a reasonably priced Peacock subscriptions. The deal Apple has with MLS might be a good deal for Apple but I don’t think it’s good for the sport.

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> How do you navigate Fred effectively?

Kagi :P. I know the names of most of these data series, so it’s searching e.g. real weekly earnings fed fred.

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> wasn't quoting him

Norman coined the term user focused design.

> may not be focus groups per se, but showing your idea to potential customers, getting feedback, refining and showing again is how it's done

Sure. I’d argue both focus groups and the lone visionary are myths. But in order to show an idea properly, you have to start thinking about building it. And to start thinking about building it properly, you have to start building it. For every Juicero there are teams iterating around a local optimum.

Tomte ranked #9 [karma: 148753]
WalterBright ranked #42 [karma: 71009]

I didn't pursue graduate work because I didn't think the payback was there for the years of study. I haven't regretted it.

JumpCrisscross ranked #11 [karma: 140486]

> Why is value needed? How much of it is sufficient for society to function?

As much as people want. A subsistence lifestyle is incredibly cheap and accessible; most of us just don't want it.

ceejayoz ranked #39 [karma: 73373]

> As a control question, ask yourself: what was the last show where the villain/antagonist/incompetent people were not white males and the protagonist was not a “diverse” woman.

Ted Lasso, probably their biggest hit? Masters of the Air?

jrockway ranked #41 [karma: 71902]

This doesn't really seem like their strategy anymore. It's not like Edge directly interprets Typescript, for example. While they embraced and extended Javascript, any extinguishing seems to be on the technical merits rather than corporate will.

In the case of security scanners that run in the kernel, we learned this weekend that a market need exists. The mainstream media blamed Crowdstrike's bugs on "Windows". Microsoft would likely like to wash its hands of future events of this class. Linux-like eBPF is a path forward for them that allows people to run the software they want (work-slowers like Crowdstrike) while isolating their reputation from this software.

jerf ranked #30 [karma: 84372]

I would also agree that the impact of AI, even in the best case scenario, will play out over years because it will take time to integrate even perfect AI into our processes. A world running on COBOL is not going to spin on a dime and run on AI, and I don't mean that sarcastically at all. That the world still runs on COBOL is an important data point in how quickly we can move things.

In fact I consider this rather obvious and borderline self-evident to a careful thinker.

However, the AI stocks are priced as if they are going to reap all the benefits, if not today, then perhaps even about a month or two ago. They are priced as if the current incumbents are the inevitable inheritors of all the promises, because the AI world is going to move so quickly to reap all this supposed value that there isn't even time for other companies to move in and displace nVidia. They are priced as if that productivity curve has already started to shoot up and it's just the beginning.

If the curve isn't even budging, then the AI world is going to need to be seriously, seriously repriced. If AI is going to change the world, but in five years rather than five months, and gradually rather than all at once, then the time value of money implies that the value to be captured in today-dollars is much, much smaller. In five years, nVidia's AI may be getting stomped by a startup that hasn't even been founded yet; I'd give it low odds, but meaningfully non-zero odds.

Whether I'm an "AI skeptic", I don't know. But I absolutely am an AI bubble skeptic. I haven't seen any evidence that the value creation is emerging at anything like the rate the bubble pricing implies. It'll probably arrive, but a lot more gradually than the market is currently believing.

toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]

"Holding Court, Responses Delayed :upside down face emoji:"

jerf ranked #30 [karma: 84372]

I struggled through having a cheap Roku for a while last year, until I finally got frustrated and looked up what they cost to replace. Without me, and perhaps others who read this, noticing, they dropped to basically "disposable" levels of price. A new modern one is $27 for the normal HD and $40 for the HD. Well below the price of the frustration I experienced trying to keep one from a few generations back going, and I'm generally relatively conservative by local standards.

Don't struggle through a slow old Roku.

And, of course, I'm not really pitching Roku, if you've got another solution or want to switch companies, that's fine too. I'm just saying, anyone reading this who has a Roku a few generations back and having simply never thought about what to do about it, have a look at replacing it. Or any other streaming box that is generally choking. I remember getting into TiVos when they cost the modern equivalent of about $350-$400 and I still haven't fully internalized that streaming boxes can cost, well, more than "a coffee at starbucks" but at this point "less than a full meal for my family at a fast food joint".

rbanffy ranked #6 [karma: 155537]

That's why it should be enough to provide for basic subsistence.

crazygringo ranked #44 [karma: 68988]

To be clear, because the article isn't obvious about it: the $20B figure is total expenditure since its inception, not a yearly figure.

For comparison, Netflix spent $17B in 2022, and $13B in 2023 (it was lower due to strikes). Disney spent $33B on content in 2022. Meanwhile, Apple spent $7B in 2022. (All numbers from Google top results).

So Apple's still spending significantly less than main "competitors", of course.

It's extremely weird for an article to give an all-time spending figure and then call it "unsustainable", when obviously sustainability depends entirely on spending per year compared with revenue per year, and this article doesn't even talk about the revenue side at all (Apple TV+ costs $9.99/mo. standalone.)

It's also hard to define "sustainability" when it's not even clear that Apple's goal is to make a profit directly, but may be to take a loss that is less than the perceived marketing value that this adds to the Apple aura/brand.

EDIT: my comment is referring to the original URL for this post which was https://wccftech.com/apple-tv-expenditure-crossed-20-billion... , not the Bloomberg article which the URL has since been changed to

WalterBright ranked #42 [karma: 71009]

Your bones get stronger when regularly stressed. Bone is added on the inside, not the outside, so you won't notice it.

I recall reading once that a pitcher's right arm had quite a bit more bone in it than his left.

TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

The problem isn't with what the user can do, but with what your code can. If you bork your escaping, which is context-dependent, then user data can turn into arbitrary HTML, complete with script tags. If you keep an abstract tree representation, and add the user-provided data by passing it vetbatim to "set text content" method on a node, then there's no possible way the user input can break it. That is exactly what it means to make illegal states unrepresentable!

Working on the data structures after parsing makes it impossible to accidentally break the structure itself. Like, maybe your string escaping is perfect, but if you do:

  $content = $templatePrefix + $sanitizedString + $templateSuffix;
Then you're still vulnerable to trivial errors in your template breaking the structure and creating an exploitable vulnerability, despite the $sanitizedString being correct. If you instead work at parsed level and do:

  $result = $template.findNode("#foo").setText($unsanitizedInput)
Then there's just no way this can break (except bugs in the HTML parser and DOM API in general, which are much less likely to exist, and much easier to find and fix).

crazygringo ranked #44 [karma: 68988]

Absolutely nothing in the confusion here is specific to English.

I don't know why you would try to take this opportunity to criticize English when this misunderstanding could be present in literally every other language.

Because there is nothing whatsoever here that is a case of linguistic confusion or vagueness -- it is a conceptual issue of comparing two items, applying an adjective to one, and leaving the reader to wonder what that implies about the other item.

And no, English is not a "dumpster fire". Every language has its pros and cons. But there is no language on Earth that is a "dumpster fire". There is absolutely nothing productive or good that can come out of blanket, utterly unfounded statements like that.

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]
nostrademons ranked #32 [karma: 78313]

A "monostate" in the design-patterns lingo of 20 years ago was a class with only static member variables, basically where all state is shared state. It was supposed to be alternative to the Singleton pattern where you don't need all those .getInstance() calls and instead can just default-construct an instance, any instance, to get access to the shared state. It fell out of favor because usage was fairly error-prone and surprising to programmers who are not familiar with the pattern. Most people expect that when you create a new instance, you are actually creating new state, but monostate intentionally makes each new instance just a window on the shared global state.

I would've thought that the C++ template class would be just a marker interface to use on a monostate, so that users of the class know that it has shared state. But it seems like usage patterns in the article are very different from that, and all the comments here are ignorant of the history of the monostate pattern and befuddled at its intended usage. Maybe it was added to the standard by someone familiar with the design pattern, but they didn't do a good job with education and documentation to explain to everyone else what it was for?

toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]
jerf ranked #30 [karma: 84372]

"If it appears as though it returns a member of ∅, it must hang/crash, because there are no members of ∅."

If you want to go with math, think more group theory. I'm specifically thinking about how you can always create a monoid if you have an associative binary operation, because even if your associative binary operation doesn't have an identity element, you can just declare one. Similarly, if you have "functions" that "return nothing", you just declare that nothing right into existence. Then you can just think of the C language layer basically erasing away any attempt to examine that value returned behind the scenes, because as you say, why?

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
rbanffy ranked #6 [karma: 155537]

As someone who lives in a place where shipping one would be more expensive than the machine itself, are there any good emulation options?

Even if we need to deal with the lack of Domain/OS specific keys.

mooreds ranked #43 [karma: 69523]
coldtea ranked #27 [karma: 86437]

>It is very difficult to save the images as bitmap (.jpeg, .mpng) or vector (.svg)

Huh? It's quite trivial, and even some tools for VS Code and other environments support it.

>You basically have to use a headless browser rendering toolkit, and guess what? The images aren't consistent (different rendering styles)

Is your problem saving Mermaid as images or lamenting cross browser rendering consistency?

If it's the former, why is the latter a problem? Use a single headless browser rendering toolkit and stick with it. Who said you need to use multiple and compare?

And there are other ways to do it, like exporting from an actual in-browser render, or even a VS Code extension - it can also be found in other tools based on Electron.

coldtea ranked #27 [karma: 86437]

>I have seen many people downplaying the complexity of a datetime library. "Just use UTC/Unix time as an internal representation", "just represent duration as nanoseconds", "just use offset instead of timezones", and on and on

Anyone thinking datetimes are easy, should not be allowed near any schedulling or date processing code!

mooreds ranked #43 [karma: 69523]

I wrote something similar in 2021 [0].

Lots of great opinion in the original piece. It's hard to pick just one piece of advice to amplify, but if you made me pick just one, it is that the risks are asymmetrical for each co-founder. The tech work is front-loaded because it is difficult to sell before something is built. I know at least one tech friend who slaved over a product that the other co-founders couldn't (or wouldn't) sell after it was built.

How can you avoid this as a non-tech co-founder? There's lots you can do to prove out the market:

* talk to potential customers

* build a no-code solution that solves part of the problem

* take people's money for a pre-sale

Yes, this is work, but so is the rest of a startup. De-risk the tech co-founder's role and you'll have a lot more success.

0: https://www.mooreds.com/wordpress/archives/3445

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

There's no doubt in my mind that Altman had the right skills to run Y Co at the time when he did.

Founders are frequently dreamers and speculators, they really should have a "reality distortion field" that will get investors, employees or customers on board. The best person to bring them out has to work in that space, being able to coach founders in doing that but they have to also avoid "getting high on their own supply", being able to build and maintain trust with a phenomenal number of stakeholders, etc.

I tried hard to pick the right word because I'm aiming for something that has positive and negative connotations. "Bullshitter" is too negative but gets to the heart of the balancing act Altman has maintained.

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

Teams work on problems like this

file:///C:/Users/ph18/Downloads/2023_eng.pdf

?

How long do they have to do it? I'd imagine it would take careful editing and also most people would need some commentary (get some superstar like Terence Tao?)

The best thing I can picture would be something similar to

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell%27s_Kitchen_(American_TV_...

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

I have been wanting to do this for my

https://www.kandaovr.com/qoocam-ego

after reading Lenny Lipton's books about stereo cinematography I've been debugging my stereograms and one thing I know is that the lenses on that thing have a little bit of pincushion distortion which means stereo pairs that are supposed to be perfectly aligned vertically aren't quite.

I know DxO makes distortion correct filters for lens/camera pairs and I was sure I could make one by taking pictures of a grid but this gives a definite path to doing it.

tptacek ranked #1 [karma: 390032]

Lots of useful code is rejected due to "not-sure-it-halts". That's the premise.

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

I second this.

Usually when I see someone who has mental health challenges on HN my advice is something like: "go see your primary care physician and see if you can get an antidepressant prescription, do as much cardio exercise as you can, develop your social supports" That's because frequently I can point out enough symptoms of depression to justify the dx. In this case I can't quite.

The word "delusion" though bothers me and, the OP is using it accurately, it could be a sign of something more serious (though I'd think most delusional people would not describe themselves as suffering from delusions; when I was under the influence of a system of delusions I was insufferable and it took about six weeks of tough love from a close friend and some misadventures right out of Don Quixote for me to snap out of it)

In this case I'd recommend talk therapy. In 2024 waiting lists are long. A close associate of mine started therapy recently and took about three months to get an appointment, so he should start now. He can probably get something in person but there are also online services like BetterHelp.

The OP might still want to see their PCP, it is not bad to get his thyroid checked and might still want to try some medication. If he does he should expect to have several contacts (maybe over the phone) with his doc to vary the dose and maybe try something different. In his case I'd want to watch carefully in case symptoms got worse. A primary care doc can also give a referral to a talk therapist (could be a psychologist, social worker, pastoral counselor, ...) or to a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner (expert in prescribing medications for people with severe mental health issues)

toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]

Institutional housing ownership in the US is not a material contributor to housing price inflation [1]. With that said, we are approaching a housing shortage of +4.5M [2] units, and in concert with YieldStar's Backpage revenue maximization engine [3] (which is laundering landlord price fixing), renters are being squeezed (because where are you going to go if you can't afford to buy? you will pay, or you will be homeless, which certain jurisdictions are attempting to or have outlawed).

To solve housing for those who need housing, enact state level YIMBY policies to override local planning (who will always kowtow to local folks who show up to say no, and local folks who say no because it costs them nothing to do so as they already own), provide cheap money to builders [4], and build as fast as you can.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_and_impact_of_institut...

[2] https://zillow.mediaroom.com/2024-06-18-The-U-S-is-now-short...

[3] https://hn.algolia.com/?dateRange=all&page=0&prefix=false&qu...

[4] https://www.startribune.com/janet-yellen-minneapolis-treasur...

(Edit: I would still support restriction of investment ownership of housing, depending on implementation details; you have to defend the young from the old and Capital, as they are treating the young as cattle to be squeezed for all they've got simply by virtue of their existence timeline [5] [6], and it's causing folks to simply give up)

[5] https://www.ted.com/talks/scott_galloway_how_the_us_is_destr...

[6] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K64GTDwWJo4

(as always, think in systems)

rbanffy ranked #6 [karma: 155537]

The mass budgets they mention point to a super heavy lifter, or, in SpaceX terms, a Superheavy-Heavy, as you'd need 3 times the payload to LEO of a standard Starship.

That's a very interesting prospect.

Or, of course, assemble 3 big pieces in orbit.

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

Elseiver is a racket. They're making money hand over fist gatekeeping world's research output, while rewarding no one doing actual research or editorial world.

As for the rest, I'm in favor of being able to train AI freely on works of culture. Current copyright regime is suffocating culture already pretty badly, let's not make it worse.

mooreds ranked #43 [karma: 69523]

If you are interested in friendship, highly recommend this podcast which looks at various aspects of it. (The host is an acquaintance.)

https://ninabadzin.com/podcasts/

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

I pay for the Jetbrain IDEs so sure.

TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

Are they? How do you store spherical cows? Do you need to roll them out to pasture and then back into the barn, or do they roll on their own?

TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

I suppose you could change the structure rather fast with a few well-placed batch operations in a shell, though I also understand why you wouldn't want it.

Regarding the randomly merged episodes, perhaps the culprit isn't the folder structure or file name patterns, but metadata on the files themselves? I never had this particular situation, but I wasted my fair share of life dealing with assumptions music players make about ID3 tags, and how they're routinely broken by files sourced from random places on the Internet.

TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

Yes, and that's what the approach from the article is trying to help with. If you're coding in a statically typed language, the "already guaranteed properties" are propagated by types, so they can't just "disappear" - there's no way to get from e.g. String to Username without going through a String->Username function that does the checks, so functions accepting Username can rely on it having the relevant properties.

Of course, this stops being true when you start hacking around the checks, side-stepping the parsers entirely (say, type-casting String to Username without any check). There's nothing a language can do to stop you when you really want to do this[0] - but then, you're an adult; if you see restrictions and safety interlocks, and put effort to hack around them, then any problem is really on you.

This gets more difficult in dynamically typed languages, as you have to rely more on naming conventions and programmers not being idiots, but even without a typechecker, it will be rather obvious when you're doing something that could break the chain of guarantees.

--

[0] - Some can try; I've seen a Haskell paper about this idea that does very complex type magic to try and truly ensure that only the parsing function can actually construct the result type. I tried reproducing that in C++ once, but C++ just can't give such guarantees.

TeMPOraL ranked #21 [karma: 105211]

> As in, progressively learn to deal with those two aspects that are instant triggers for an ADHD mind to run away?

Regular life will do that to you anyway; not sure how a game is going to help.

If anything, particularly when aimed at kids, it's main effect is likely exhausting the video game time budget parents allotted to the kid, possibly souring the whole class of entertainment to them. Which I guess may look like a win to outsiders if the kid happens to use videogames to cope with ADHD. Not sure if it's a win for the kid.

stavros ranked #50 [karma: 64789]

At some point you have to consider the ergonomics in the target language, otherwise you're just going to speak Türkçe instead of English.

Animats ranked #10 [karma: 140516]

Communications Based Train Control is a bit worrisome. It's too centralized, and worse, sometimes, the central part is outsourced.[1]

[1] https://www.mobility.siemens.com/global/en/portfolio/digital...

Animats ranked #10 [karma: 140516]

> Those look like pretty normal diesel-electric locomotives.

Yes. Here's UP 8359 hauling a trainload of grain.[1] It's a common locomotive type, SD70ACe, with thousands in use. Dull, boring, and reliable. Way too many pictures of UP 8359 doing ordinary locomotive things.[2]

The armored caboose, VWXX-800, is a custom build designed for the Navy.[3]

[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FX9vgSOAdA

[2] http://www.rcbsd45.rrpicturearchives.net/Locopicture.aspx?id...

[3] https://www.twz.com/39654/wait-this-mysterious-heavily-armor...

ceejayoz ranked #39 [karma: 73373]
hn_throwaway_99 ranked #47 [karma: 66902]

In my experience, the related joke is triathletes should only date other triathletes.

The difference compared to golf/tennis/softball is that I know tons of people that play those sports recreationally (only on the weekends or a couple times a week), while everyone I know that is into triathlons trains for multiple hours a day. Triathlons tend to attract people who have an "all in" mindset - after all, if you just wanted to do it as easy recreation, you'd probably just take up one of the sports and then, say, run a 10k every now and then.

So yeah, training for triathlons is time consuming, and people who want to find a better balance between their relationships and their hobbies probably takes up another sport.

userbinator ranked #33 [karma: 78073]

Imagine if x86 had POPCNT since the beginning, implemented in microcode at first, and optimised it over time to be faster and use more available hardware. There would be no need for this sort of "decompiler" in a compiler nor would software need recompilation for each CPU model.

ceejayoz ranked #39 [karma: 73373]

Manchin has burned far too many bridges.

signa11 ranked #35 [karma: 77619]

umm, embedded devices without active cooling f.e. those node-b’s sitting on cellphone towers come to mind here, there can be quite a few other similar examples i can think of.

userbinator ranked #33 [karma: 78073]

I absolutely hate this focus on "security"; it's just pushing us faster towards the authoritarian dystopia that Stallman warned us about 25+ years ago.

This decision means security software vendors have a greater ability to muck up systems as CrowdStrike did this week when it crippled 8.5 million Windows PCs worldwide.

...and what about when Microsoft inevitably screws something up with its automatic updates and undoubtedly affects even more machines? They already have, multiple times. One of the most recent memorable occurrences: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18189139

As the old saying goes, "Those who give up freedom for security deserve neither."

userbinator ranked #33 [karma: 78073]

Dual (50% overclocked) Celerons on a BP6 was a relatively common enthusiast setup in the early 2000s. 128M of RAM was also not a huge amount then.

toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]

They might be friends, but more often than not, coworkers are NPCs you’ll never hear from again after separating from the org. Certainly keep friends, but don’t sabotage yourself for some mistaken idea of collective and shared struggle. It’s just a job.

toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]
PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

I used to shoot Canon with an APS-C body for a long time the only lens I had was a 20 mm (full frame) prime.

I lost that camera and lens and when I was ready to go mirrorless I went with Sony because I could only see people complaining about the autofocus on the entry level full frame cameras from Nikon and Canon so I went with Sony.

With the Canon I had to play with the curves to get photos I liked, with the Sony I like the pics straight out of the camera and only started adjusting regularly once I started using DxO to clean up noise in sports photography.

If I had to do it all again I'd consider going with Nikon because their top-of-the-line cameras are great.

Animats ranked #10 [karma: 140516]

What this sounds like is this:

- The author is pushing a specific proposal (a "council of stakeholders") in the pension space.

- To support that, he wrote a long paper with much supporting information.

- The ChatGPT summary system didn't pick up on his proposal being the important thing.

- The author doesn't like that.

userbinator ranked #33 [karma: 78073]

There was a prediction from 2016 that things would get much worse for CPU bugs starting with Skylake:

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16058920

It seems that article was updated with this one too.

nostrademons ranked #32 [karma: 78313]

Interesting. I read through the ChatGPT summary first, it seemed very plausible, then I read the original and I kinda see the author's point. The ChatGPT summary basically did gloss over every important detail in the original - but then, the details weren't important for generating a summary.

I think that one of the author's key premises is false:

> To summarise, you need to understand what the paper is saying.

A summary is not about the author or about the summarizer, it's about the reader. It's about picking up on the portions of the original work that will matter to the reader's estimation of whether it's important to read the full work. And that actually depends much more on context and how the work relates to other works than it does about the specific details contained in the work. For example, Betteridge's Law of Headlines [1] basically provides a summary of any article whose title ends in a question, that summary is just "No", and it does so by making an observation about the authors rather than the content of the articles (about which it's completely agnostic).

It reminds me of the problems that plague AI sentiment analysis. Machine learning is actually very good at that task, but you top out at about 70% precision because humans top out at 70% precision on sentiment analysis. At best, people only agree with each other ~70% of the time when judging the sentiment of a piece.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betteridge%27s_law_of_headline...

Animats ranked #10 [karma: 140516]

Reasonable prototype. What else is available in this space, as a finished product you buy and which isn't tied to some service?

I'm surprised this isn't a Raspberry Pi thing.

hn_throwaway_99 ranked #47 [karma: 66902]

Biden wasn't running for chief scientist somewhere, he was running for President of the United States, and a huge part (probably the primary part) of that job is being able to communicate effectively. If "your brain isn't able to adequately influence the movement of the vocal cords and the tongue the lips and the jaw" then you shouldn't be applying for a job where verbal communication is paramount.

Animats ranked #10 [karma: 140516]

A corporate push for Windows 7 Forever might be in order. Windows 7 was Microsoft's best OS. Most of the bugs had been fixed by then, and reliability was good. No subscriptions, no ads, and updating was optional.

There's almost nothing since then that's really needed in a business.

rbanffy ranked #6 [karma: 155537]

Also, this is a very level-headed and fact-based article, on a subject of the utmost importance.

I like to believe we can discuss politics like adults.

toomuchtodo ranked #28 [karma: 85290]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVW0-efpR-A (“YouTube: LegalEagle: Logan Paul sued Coffeezilla and it's Crap (ft. Coffezilla's Lawyers”)

jseliger ranked #29 [karma: 84512]
nostrademons ranked #32 [karma: 78313]

I think that legal precedent is significantly out of date, as many municipalities now have daylight planes as part of their zoning codes, which mandate that sunlight at a certain angle must be able to hit a neighbor's property.

dragonwriter ranked #16 [karma: 117873]

> Threatening people to make them behave a certain way is actually illegal, even if that threat is legal action

No, its generally not. Every legal demand letter is a threat of legal action intended to produce a desired behavioral outcome in the target. Needless to say, issuing a demand letter is not generally itself illegal.

> Especially if you are trying to stop someone from doing something well within their rights

Threats of either actions which are themselves illegal (prohibited violence) or threats with illegal purposes (suppression of protected rights) are often illegal,but that's a lot narrower than “Threatening people to make them behave a certain way is actually illegal”.

dragonwriter ranked #16 [karma: 117873]

> For English, it's quite different because many countries list it as their official language but may have diverged spellings and meanings and there is no single body to direct the curriculum. The most notable is the US

The US doesn't have an official language, though most institutions operate primarily in English, and all US states that have one or more official languages include English on that list.

pjmlp ranked #18 [karma: 107655]

Legend says, had it not been for the unexpected MS-DOS success, they would keep being a UNIX shop.

steveklabnik ranked #24 [karma: 90160]

The unreachable macro invokes a panic. It wouldn’t be allowed if panics were not allowed.

coldtea ranked #27 [karma: 86437]

Keyword "butter". This is "food".

crazygringo ranked #44 [karma: 68988]

As far as preventing forgery/tampering with the number, it's funny because this applies to merely the smallest part.

The "j" instead of "i" prevents you from adding another 1 or 2 to the number, at most.

Meanwhile, you could still change "ii" to "vii" or "xii" or "lxii" or whatever on the left side.

And still often append "i" on the right side when it doesn't end in "j" -- "x" can still become "xj", "xij", "xvij", etc.

It's just funny that you'd bother at all with "j" when it achieves so little. I see that it was also a practice to draw a line over the number -- why not just draw a whole box around it?

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
coldtea ranked #27 [karma: 86437]

For the obvious reasons.

What is interesting to you? Talk about QM or compiler internals? Celebrity gossip? There are way more interesting things in the world, and this is one of those.

This is a forum for hackers and startup types. Long lasting flame wars and user behavior in forums are already in the set of topics of interest. Someone returning to a thread after a 100k hour ban is by itself hugely amusing.

Besides, posts don't get on the home page based on some personal or objective criterium for "interesting-ness". They get on the first page based on voting.

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]
coldtea ranked #27 [karma: 86437]

>If a certain piece of software is working well, what is the benefit of rewriting it in Rust?

Presumablly the idea here is to support Rust replay debugging, not just rewrite a C/C++ targetting replay debugger in Rust

bookofjoe ranked #34 [karma: 77844]

See also: Museum of Failure https://museumoffailure.com/

pjmlp ranked #18 [karma: 107655]

Andrei Alexandrescu is back focusing on C++ at NVIDIA.

pjmlp ranked #18 [karma: 107655]

For all practical purposes, as true in 2024, as in 1988, except for the few ones that actually care about using modern analysis tooling in their development workflows.

coldtea ranked #27 [karma: 86437]

Squarespace CMO should be sent to do hard rock-breaking labour in re-education camps for capitalists, says Gen Z

stavros ranked #50 [karma: 64789]

Is it "eye" or "ey"? I remember "destijl" pronounced "de steyl" and not "de style".

PaulHoule ranked #38 [karma: 74367]

At my Uni we have an enterprise contract with Microsoft for Copilot that constrains what can be done with our data.

I’d imagine keeping track of the prompts would be highly valuable for evaluation if not training because you do want to know what people are doing it, where it succeeds, where it fails, etc.

Tomte ranked #9 [karma: 148753]
userbinator ranked #33 [karma: 78073]

Of course twimg.com is _probably_ owned and operated by Twitter.

https://www.whois.com/whois/twimg.com

Looking at the registrant email confirms that it is. I've seen the twimg domain a lot as it's used for their images (pbs.twimg.com) too.

WalterBright ranked #42 [karma: 71009]

I've never liked default constructors when it produces something that is not representable without executing code. D does not have default constructors. What one does is specify the statically initialized field values (or leave the fields to be set to their statically initialized value). I.e. it has a default initializer.

What this means in practice is one never is presented with an uninitialized or partially initialized struct. A non-default constructor gets handed a default initialized struct to start with. This makes for more reliable software. (Double initialization can be removed by the optimizer.)

Why D doesn't have default constructors gets brought up now and then, as it is an unusual choice.

walterbell ranked #31 [karma: 83246]

Can users whitelist select domains that are "trusted"?

pjmlp ranked #18 [karma: 107655]

It was great for us, AOL and Vignette back in 1999.

But it is also the reason why I don't use any dynamic language without JIT for production code, unless I have no say in the matter.

We took advantage of being a MSFT gold partner, moved into .NET when it wasn't yet known to the world, and our founders eventually moved on, and OutSystems was born out of our learnings.